(Source: c-i-g-a-r-r-o-s)

(Source: loves4free)

Your father, he helped give us the atomic bomb. Now, what kind of world would it be today if he was as selfish as you?

(Source: chrsevanss)

(Source: ewatsondaily)

(Source: xanis)

madskizophrenik:

I am officially in love with this girl.  Many had doubts about her playing Selina Kyle but so did they about Heath Ledger and look at how that turned out.  I loved her in The Dark Knight Rises but I had my eye on her way before that…I had seen her in HAVOC and thought she was really good, quite a big jump from The Princess Diaries which is a family movie…I like the fact that she got involved into bigger and darker films.  She is absolutely hot.

abigaildonaldson:

Fashion in Film: The Devil Wears Prada (2006)

Okay, can you please spell Gabbana? Hello?

When it came to costuming author Lauren Weisberger’s quasi-autobiographical tale about a fashion assistant and her tyrannical boss, there was only one woman for the job: Patricia Field, the stylist known for cementing Carrie Bradshaw as a fashion icon on Sex and the City.

Field took the film’s allotted $100,000 wardrobe budget, made a few calls to designers friends, and managed to pull together a spread of clothes and accessories totaling $1 million in a mere three weeks.

“It has to be over 100 designers,” Field said. “We could never have done it without my friends in the fashion industry helping us along. It would have been impossible. The level of fur coats, and designer bags – oh my God.”

 Dolce & Gabbana, Calvin Klein, Chanel, Valentino, Donna Karan, and of course, Prada, were just a few of the designer wares seen prominently throughout the film. Meryl Streep, whose character alone had 60 changes, could hardly believe the excess.

“These clothes cost so much money,” Streep said. “One of the handbags was $12,000. It’s almost inconceivable to me. So then a $4,000 bag seems like a bargain. You just re-adjust your whole way of thinking. It’s just insane.”

One minor roadblock Field did face was designers refusing to participate in fear of getting on the wrong side of Vogue editor-in-chief, Anna Wintour, whom Weisberger’s “Devil” is based on. However, any subsequent backlash was of no consequence to Field.

“I’m not dependent on Vogue. I’m not a designer who’s trying to sell to Neiman Marcus,” Field said. “I wanted very much not to zone in on Vogue and Anna Wintour. It was a movie about the fashion world. Outside the fashion world, how many people in the general audience know who Anna Wintour is? To make it too fashion-specific, you lose the general audience. A lot of those fashion movies, they get too insider.”